lost without a cause.




The real challenge in my life, the real hardship is me. It’s always been me. As long as I can remember I’ve never not been afraid. Afraid of failure, of letting people down, hurting people, getting hurt. I thought if I kept my guard up and focused on other things, other people, if I couldn’t even feel it, well then no harm would come to me. I screwed up. When I shut out the pain, I shut out everything. The good and the bad. Until there was nothing. It’s fine to just live in the now, but the best part about ‘now’ is there’s another one tomorrow. And I’m gonna start making them count.

- The Spectacular Now (via wordsthat-speak)

(via wordsthat-speak)

Like this post

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 
master-of-duct-tape:

elly-hiddlesherloki:

zarhooie:

constant-instigator:

Also, just throwing this out there to make people sad, but…
When he’s thawed out he’s laying down. He was frozen laying down. And the plane hit the water when he was in the pilot seat- we saw that.
Which means he wasn’t knocked out by the initial impact. And it doesn’t look like he drowned, either. He had time to see his expected death coming, after the impact, and lay himself down. My guess is some internal injuries from the crash, followed by freezing to death inside the plane.
So just go ahead an add a little scene in your head of Steve surviving the crash, but knowing that wet and isolated on a field of ice, in a plane that’s still sinking, nobody would get to him in time. But he knows he’s done his job. So he lays down, and closes his eyes, and maybe wonders if anyone will ever find his body, and bring it back to be buried by his mom and dad, since Bucky never was buried. But either way they’ll have a service for him, and that will be nice, and the priest will say the words and he’ll be at rest. And he feels bad, leaving his men, and he regrets everything he never told Peggy, and that he won’t be there for her now, but at least he did his part, right? He got the job done, and that’s what counts. If he dies alone, bleeding out and freezing, that’s all that Bucky got, to. So that’s all right.